Massage Therapy Education Today

Find Massage Therapy Education in the United States and Canada. Whether you elect to enroll in massage therapy education programs that teach Swedish massage or Shiatsu (a form of acupressure), there are many alternative healing schools and vocational schools that offer a large training assortment of massage methods.

Today, becoming a professional 출장마사지 massage therapist may be as little as 300 class hours* away. (Curriculum requirements vary from state to state.) Depending on the state in which you reside and the particular field of bodywork you are pursuing, massage therapy education courses typically include basic studies in Swedish massage, deep tissue massage, sports massage, pathology, anatomy, physiology, kinesiology and range of motion. In addition, some massage therapy education courses supplement training with general business management classes.

In more comprehensive massage therapy education programs, students can acquire hands-on training in trigger point massage, orthobionomy, Tuina (Chinese medical massage), neuromuscular therapy, aromatherapy massage, reflexology, chair massage, Indian head massage, craniosacral therapy, and many other methodologies. Aforementioned massage therapy education is considerably longer in course duration, and may range from a 500-hour to a 1,000-hour or more certificate/diploma program. In addition, some technical colleges that offer massage therapy education courses may even extend degree programs in this healing art.

Some massage therapy education courses are geared toward specialized care. For example, there are some massage classes that specifically involve training in prenatal and infant massage, animal/equine massage, Thai massage, Aston Patterning, oncology massage, geriatric massage, Qi Gong, connective tissue massage, EMF balancing, Feldenkrais, among others.

Students who successfully fulfill all required massage therapy education for their state of residence may go onto becoming certified and/or licensed massage therapists. Currently, the average income of a professional body worker ranges from just over $7/hr to $32/hr.* (Incomes vary and are based on education, experience, and location.) In addition, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, successful candidates can expect faster than average employment growth over the next decade.

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